Thursday, March 7, 2013

When being cute can be deadly....

Original source unknown
Easter is coming and sadly many people head out to buy chicks for their children. As if it were not already hard enough for chick during the Easter season, some people make these poor little chicks even more "appealing" to buyers by dyeing them. Yes, you read that right, they dye them. People see photos like this one from Facebook and say "Oh how cute!" But trust me, this is not cute. Let me tell you why.............

First off, the way these chickens are "made." I am not about to tell you anything you couldn't find out on your own, so it is not that I am telling you how to do it, just how it is done. And egg is INJECTED with food color during the embryo's development. That's right folks, they take a needle, shove it through the shell and inject food coloring into a developing baby chick. They then seal the egg shut and wait for it to hatch. Isn't that cute! (Note my sarcasm here.)

Now you might think, well, dyeing for scientific purposes with vegetable dye for wildlife management studies is acceptable. Remember folks, these are not being dyed for wildlife management studies...... they are being dyed so people will buy them because they think they are neat. And injecting a chick may cause death to the unborn chick if done incorrectly. But who cares, right? (Note my sarcasm here.)

Well someone cares because in some states it is illegal to dye chicks. Yes that's right, against the law. Need proof? Check out this article by the Duck Rescue Network which has examples of some of the state laws regarding dying chicks. Why is it against the law? Well in some states, people see shoving a needle in an egg to make chicks cute at Easter, well, animal cruelty.

But it is not so much of how these chicks get dyed as the why. Like I said, scientist do use this method for research. The why is simple, to sell chicks. People see them, go awwwww, buy one and there goes another dead chicken. I say dead chicken because most people buy them as an impulse buy. Their homes have no brooder box waiting for the chick. They usually only buy one, so the chick has no one to huddle with for warmth (remember no brooder box.) The majority of these chicks don't have a fighting chance. And if they do manage to grow up, once they molt, well the cute color is GONE. That's right folks, it is no longer "cute." People then have a chicken that they don't want all in the name of a cute Easter purchase.

I think it is about high time that people realize they can and should care and make a difference when it comes to situations like this. Don't share photos like the one above because "it's cute" or humorous. It is not cute or funny, when an animals life is on the line. I think mother nature did a wonderful job making chicks cute. There is nothing more beautiful then the natural colors and patterns found on baby chicks. And I think it is high time people remember, an animal is not a toss away "thing." If you aren't ready to be there for that chicken for the rest of its life (an average of 7 years), well then leave it at the store.

 





41 comments:

  1. Wonderful post Mindie. You are spot on and if everyone who reads this shares it, and even one chick's life is saved your time has been well-spent. Good job crusading for the tiny fluff balls! Lisa
    Fresh Eggs Daily
    www.fresh-eggs-daily.com

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  2. It's a marketing gimmick, and the sad part (besides the dyeing of the chicks) is that humans fall for it and the chicks suffer.

    visit a local farm that has chicks or if you do buy chicks, do it right and for the right reasons!

    Sheila
    farmhousewife of
    www.hopefarms.co

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  3. This is disturbing! I had never seen a dyed chick before but it's sad. People actually buy their kids chicks and bunnies for Easter?! Oh my!

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  4. Great post! I couldn't agree more. But since posting misinformation can sometimes cause people to ignore all your good and valid points, I wanted to quickly point out a couple of things. I would hate for anyone to dismiss what you are saying, because it is so important.
    1)Many, but perhaps not all, states do require a minimum purchase of 6 or 12 chicks to avoid just this issue of people buying just one or two with no real commitment.
    2)Within just a couple of weeks the dyed fur is replaced with feathers, so as soon as their natural plumage comes in the so called "cute" dye isn't even seen anymore. They don't even have to grow up and molt before this artificial cuteness is gone!!!! It is ridiculous...

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  5. I was horrified that a friend picked up a chick (not colored even) for each one of her kids for easter last year...with no intention of ever raising chickens. I never found out what happened to them. Scared to know.

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  6. Thats so sad. I wish these parents would act responsible for once and give a big fat NO to their kids asking for one.

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  7. This is worse than running a puppy mill! SHAME on these people! It is mind boggling to me how anyone could wish to profit from the certain death of any living creature. It is just plain barbaric.

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  8. excellent info for us Brits who've never heard or seen such a thing as it is not done over here and would be illegal if someone wanted to do it. But then de-scenting ferrets, slicing the ears off dogs, cutting puppies tails off and amputating cat's toes is also illegal here.

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  9. What the hell is wrong with people???!!!
    I had also never seen or heard of this before.
    How can people think that's ok in this day and age?

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    1. I have seen it before and agree it's awful. Never really read articles before, just believe it's so wrong. I agree with all the commenters here. Great article. I agree with the poster about cutting off dogs' tails and ears and cats' toes. I am glad the ferrets we had were descented though as we had 4 and they still had a good scent even when bathed and the cage cleaned once/wk. and litter box 2 times/day. Leave animals alone folks. Natural is best and no irresponsible idiots. Deb

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  10. That's both disturbing and macabre. Does it actually hurt the chickens? Renal failure or liver maybe? You didn't say...

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  11. I have always wondered how this happens, and now I know. :(
    That makes it even worse!

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  12. Makes me wonder just how low some people will stoop to make a buck. Animal exploitation along with all blood sports should be banned.

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  13. Thank goodness this is not practiced in Australia for marketing. I had no idea they were injected with dye in their shells! Shameful.

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  14. That is just disgusting :( I have never seen or heard of this before, and hope I never will...

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  15. The whole practice is just barbaric. You don't buy a living creature without the intent of caring for it. And this doesn't really set a good example for the kids. I am just curious though, why would they inject them rather than dip them after they are hatched?

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    Replies
    1. It all depends on who does it, which way they do it. Neither practices are good because it sets poor animals up to be viewed as toys :(

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  16. Excellent post and I am with you 100%. Like you, I think the larger issue is not the needle, but the perpetuation of the idea that animals are cute toys for people to play with and toss away when they tire of them. It happens far too often, and it is tragic. Found this on Homestead Barn Hop.

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    1. It is tragic and people need to be woken up to realize animals are living being with feelings..... not just an object.

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  17. OMG, that is just awful. I've never seen anything like this and appalled by it. I just don't understand how and why people exploit animals like this. I'm so glad you wrote this article and hope that it sheds some light on this terrible practice.

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    Replies
    1. It is sad that some folks will do anything for a buck :(

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  18. I have never seen the chicks coloured like this...but makes sense how dangerous this could be. First time visitor to your blog. Like the backsplash. My sister in law is an organic farmer & we love going to visit her 'homestead' and the animals (being raised ethically as well I might add). Thanks for sharing @ Share Your Stuff Tuesdays!

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    1. Welcome Rachael!!! Thanks for popping by! I hope you hang around :)

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  19. This is so sad. Another example of how far the human race has to go. We haven't evolved in the last 2000 years at all! Makes me very very sad people would do such a thing! Horrible just horrible.

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    1. Greed, pure and simple. Any thing to make a buck :(

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  20. Unfortunately there is another way to do this that my mother told me about, after birth they are dipped in the dye while their little beak holes for breathing are covered so they don't drown. She was given one as a child, luckily she lived on a farm so the chick had proper care, but she was pretty repulsed by the whole thing.

    It is sad that people give live animals (rabbits, too) to children as gifts without thinking it through.

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  21. Stopping by from the farm blog hop. I don't believe animals should be sold in stores, period. Your post was very informational. Shared! Chrystal @ YUMeating.com

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    1. Aww thanks for popping by and sharing :)

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  22. I did not know about this practice. what a sad story.... I do love buying chicks in the spring: they are so cute. But we think the adult chickens they grow into are cute as well, and they are our backyard pets; members of the backyard family.....
    Happy Easter to you and yours…. :)
    “hugs” Crystelle
    Crystelle Boutique

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    1. And that is the way it should be... cute in the spring and beautiful for life!

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  23. I was telling my son last week about the dyed baby chicks that used to be sold when I was a child growing up in the 1950's. I collect vintage dolls from the 1950's and I was setting up an Easter scene and had little colored chicks in the scene. He told me he remembered them growing up in the 1980's. I was surprised because I thought they had been outlawed long before his time. It's so sad to hear that it's still being done. I remember my mother's friend's child getting a duck one Easter. He was probably 4 years old and killed it by running it over with his toy tractor. Knowing his mother she probably got the duck for a photo op. It bothered me then and it still bothers me today.

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    1. Thank you for sharing. It makes me so sad people give animals as gifts any time of the year.

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  24. It's illegal to dye animals here in Florida. Thank you for sharing at Tuesdays with a Twist (no rules). We hope to see you back again today.

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    1. I am glad to hear it is illegal where you live

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  25. Thanks so much for sharing at Green Thumb Thursday! I pinned this to my children's garden/homesteading board and would love to invite you to pin there, as you see fit. Here's a link http://www.pinterest.com/homesteadlady/childrens-gardenshomesteading/, if you're interested. You'll need to follow the board so I can issue you an invite. Have a great week!

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  26. It's high time someone said this aloud! You go girl!!!!!!!!!!!

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